About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
summer, republican governor rick snyder of michigan signed a bill to expand the use of telemedicine in his state. his new law requires that insurance companies have to pay for treatment that you get via contact with a doctor through like a web cam or otherwise online. it's telemedicine. governor snyder was so excited to sign this thing. he said at the time, "telemedicine offers an incredible opportunity to easily provide health care to michigan's elderly, disabled, and rural communities. i applaud the legislature's initiative to use technology to save lives." the bill got unanimous support. governor snyder signed it with his big happy statement about how awesome this was going to be. he was so excited. yay, telemedicine. telemedicine, you are the future for michigan. you are saving lives. that was this summer. tonight that same governor snyder is poised to sign another law in michigan that would ban the use of telemedicine in that state, specifically for one type of medical care. it's the same type of medical care provided at clinics in michigan that governor snyder is poised to sin
funder of the anti-union rights ambush attack that is going on in michigan right now. with support from conservative outfits like to mackinaw foundation and americans for prosperity, both of which are funded by the be afraid to vote billboards guy, michigan republicans have turned on a dime since they lost seats in this last election. they are moving now at lightning speed to strip union rights in the state of michigan, unilaterally, immediately, irreversebly, and without any meaningful chance for debate. it is the biggest political news in the country. on the anti-union side of the surprise attack, you will find the right wing institutes in the midwest and in the upper plains with funding from the voting is scary foundation. on the other side, fighting to defend union rights, you'll find, naturally, unions, which of course will be essentially gotten rid of with this legislation that the republicans and their conservative donors are pushing through. think about that. it's kind of a striking thing here. the raw political side of this. the nation magazine looked into who the supporters we
he is again marching that day. he became a union organizer in michigan in the sometimes difficult and sometimes violent strikes of 1936 and '37. at the time workers in the big auto plants were coming home sick and injured and exhausted. and no matter how long or how hard they worked, they were coming home broke too. the auto companies didn't want unions, but the workers struck and they struck hard, and the workers eventually won. on february 11th, 1937, gm signed its first contract with the uaw, the united auto workers. if you called this contract the beginning of the american middle class and michigan the birthplace of the american labor union, and walter ruther the father of all that, you probably wouldn't be much overstating your case. mr. reuther was born in west virginia. he learned tool and dye making in a union family. he moved to michigan and found a job in the automobile industry. he found his life's work in helping its workers. he said, quote, there is no greater calling than to serve your fellow men there is no greater contribution than to help the week there is no grea
of michigan on that issue today that we're going to be getting to. there is news about who is going to be in the united states senate in this next congress. we found out yesterday who is being tapped to replace senator jim demint, who is leaving the senate. we also found out yesterday who might replace john kerry if he leaves the senate to be secretary of state. we found out today who is the odds-on favorite to replace long-time hawaii senator daniel inouye, who died yesterday. we've got all that news ahead. >>> but we begin tonight with something that is an important story in its own terms. but for those of us at msnbc and nbc news, it is also an incredibly emotional thing. and i can tell you, it ends with good news. it ends with this news, which i can say personally was greeted by all of us as the best news in the world when we saw it. it's nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel, looking a little disheveled, a little less groomed than usual, but as you can see, looking like himself. on the left this is ghazi balkiz and john klooister, a long-time nbc news photographer. th
, or since. >> good evening, america. my name is jered townsend from michigan. to all the candidates, tell me your position on gun control as myself and other americans really want to know if our babies are safe. this is my baby, purchased under the 1994 gun ban. please tell me your views. thank you. >> senator biden, are you going to be able to keep his baby safe? >> i tell you what, if that's his baby, he needs help. [ applause ] i think he just made an admission against self-interest. i don't know that he is mentally qualified to own that gun. i'm being serious. look, this idea, we go around talking about people who own -- i'm the guy that originally wrote the assault weapons ban. look, we should be working with law enforcement right now to make sure that we protect people against people who don't -- are not capable of knowing what to do with a gun. >> time. >> because they're either mentally unbalanced and/or because they have a criminal record. >> time. >> anyway. >> we got one more question. >> i hope he doesn't come looking for me. >> that was july of 2007. joe biden was running for pr
to continue them. here's the headline out of michigan. 85,000. 85,000 michiganders losing unemployment benefits. here's the palm beach post, 115,000 floridians being cut at the end of the year. 43,000 in connecticut could lose unemployment benefits. a few minutes ago, you heard jeff merkley of oregon mention, i believe, the 30,000 in oregon. one of the things that has been lost in all the fiscal cliff wrangling over the last couple of months is something really dramatic will happen really soon that will affect a ton of people who cannot, cannot afford it. four days from now, if washington cannot find a way to get its act together, 2 million people will lose their unemployment benefits. all at once. they will go all go away. unemployment insurance is different from the other parts of the fiscal cliff in that way. there are tricks we can play on, say, the pack side. we can change withholdings so you don't notice it. and on the spending side, instead of laying off people, we can furlough them. there are things we can do in a lot of parts of the fiscal cliff, if we do over for a week, two
, as -- people in michigan are telling me, my family and friends, over christmas, is that they really want us just to sit down and work together and get something done. and when we're talking about an average of $2,200 in increased taxes potentially on a middle-class family, you know, i have one woman say that's four months' groceries for her kids. people here may think this is some kind of chess game. this is serious business. it's serious for the economy. it's serious for families. and you know, it's pretty hard to see this thing go round and round and round like it is. >> senator debbie stabenow of michigan, thank you very much for your time tonight. >> you're welcome. >> so maybe the super dangerous mess in washington is the fault of both sides. that's what people say. i mean, there are plenty of people who say that in public all the time. except that it is not. and we can prove it to you. that bit of business is coming up. ave a cold. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)